Stocks suffered their worst September since 2002. What that means for October. – MarketWatch

Stocks suffered their worst September since 2002. What that means for October. – MarketWatch:

Since 1950, September has been the worst performing month of the year for the Dow Jones Industrial Average, S&P 500 and Russell 1000 and the worst for the Nasdaq Composite since 1971 and the small-cap Russell 2000 since 1979, according to the Stock Trader’s Almanac.

Byron Auguste On Rewiring the U.S. Labor Market (Ep. 160) | Conversations with Tyler

Byron Auguste On Rewiring the U.S. Labor Market (Ep. 160) | Conversations with Tyler:

in 1983, with the nation at risk, we suddenly decided, “Oh, point of high school is for everyone to go to college.” No one had told high schools up until that point. Now that that’s the case, the basic problem is, if you keep the number of college seats constant, and you demand that everybody try to go to college — and in fact, if businesses, to some extent, weaponize college degrees by saying, “Oh, if you don’t have a college degree, you can’t get into a decent job” — well then, suddenly you’ve got a huge demand for college degrees, and you’ve got basically mostly fixed supply.

*This was a wonderful podcast episode. Worth a listen. Link nearby should be to the transcript page. Should be able to find link or player to listen there too.

Why ‘digital literacy’ is now a workplace non-negotiable – BBC Worklife

Why ‘digital literacy’ is now a workplace non-negotiable – BBC Worklife:

… employees need to assume they’ll keep upgrading digital skills. After all, the expectation when a worker begins a new role is either they have the digital skills to do the job or they’ll learn them – fast. “Hybrid and remote working were only relevant to 5% of the workforce before the pandemic,” says Zhou. “It’s nearly half of all workers now. Regardless of what work you did previously, an employer now expects you to learn whatever digital skills are required in a role.”

James David Rogers sentenced to prison for threats against Eva LaRue – The Washington Post

James David Rogers sentenced to prison for threats against Eva LaRue – The Washington Post:

The FBI caught on to Rogers’s trail after taking DNA found on the envelope of one of his letters and running it through a genetic genealogy database, according to CNN. That gave agents a list of the suspect’s relatives and led them to a small town in Ohio where they surveilled Rogers. After he threw an Arby’s bag in a dumpster, agents collected it and matched DNA from a soda straw to what they’d found on the letter, CNN reported.

Tips for finding travel deals – The Washington Post

Tips for finding travel deals – The Washington Post:

if you’re looking for a discounted cruise or vacation package, a big-box store probably isn’t the first place that comes to mind. Maybe it should be. Wholesale stores such as Sam’s Club and Costco have earned reputations for offering deep discounts, particularly during the pandemic, according to deal experts.
“The deals posted to their website tend to be anywhere from 10 to 30 percent less,” says Andrea Woroch, a Bakersfield, Calif.-based budget travel expert.

Minnesota faces largest private sector nurses strike in U.S. history – The Washington Post

Minnesota faces largest private sector nurses strike in U.S. history – The Washington Post:

For years, hospitals in the United States have faced understaffing problems. A surge in demand and increased safety risks for nurses during the pandemic accelerated those trends. The number of health-care workers in the United States has still not recovered to its pre-pandemic levels, down 37,000 workers compared with February 2020.

White House scrambles to avert looming railroad strike – The Washington Post

White House scrambles to avert looming railroad strike – The Washington Post:

The freight industry has warned that the strike would shut down 30 percent of the country’s freight and “halt most passenger and commuter rail services.” A freight railroad shutdown could “devastate” Amtrak operations, according to the Association of American Railroads, with roughly half of commuter rail systems running at least partially on tracks or rights of way owned by freight railroads.

Norman Mineta, transportation secretary who helped create TSA, dies at 90 – The Washington Post

Norman Mineta, transportation secretary who helped create TSA, dies at 90 – The Washington Post:

The Civil Liberties Act of 1988 authorized $20,000 in reparations for each surviving internee; it passed with support from both parties and served as an official recognition that the incarceration of Japanese Americans was wrong, a result of “race prejudice, war hysteria, and a failure of political leadership,” as a presidential panel had concluded.

Was unaware of this.