Feb 162021
 

The Auto Industry Bets Its Future on Batteries – The New York Times:

Long considered one of the least interesting car components, batteries may now be one of the most exciting parts of the auto industry. Car manufacturing hasn’t fundamentally changed in 50 years and is barely profitable, but the battery industry is still ripe for innovation.

Several battery factories are in the planning or construction phase in the United States, including a factory G.M. is building in Ohio with LG, but analysts said federal incentives for electric car and battery production would be crucial to creating a thriving industry in the United States.

all of the money pouring into battery technology is good news. It puts capitalism to work on solving a global problem. But this reordering of the auto industry will also claim some victims, like the companies that build parts for internal combustion engine cars and trucks, or automakers and investors that bet on the wrong technology.

The first priority for the industry is to make batteries cheaper. Batteries for a midsize electric car cost about $15,000, or roughly double the price they need to be for electric cars to achieve mass acceptance, Mr. Srinivasan said.

Longer term, the industry holy grail is solid state batteries, which will replace the liquid lithium solution at the core of most batteries with solid layers of a lithium compound. Solid state batteries would be more stable and less prone to overheating, allowing faster charging. They would also weigh less.

Elon Musk, Tesla’s chief executive, said on a recent conference call with analysts. “Prototypes are easy. Scaling production is very hard.”

*Interesting article. 

Dec 282020
 

Insecure wheels: Police turn to car data to destroy suspects’ alibis:

investigators have realized that automobiles — particularly newer models — can be treasure troves of digital evidence. Their onboard computers generate and store data that can be used to reconstruct where a vehicle has been and what its passengers were doing. They reveal everything from location, speed and acceleration to when doors were opened and closed, whether texts and calls were made while the cellphone was plugged into the infotainment system, as well as voice commands and web histories.

Jan 142020
 

UZH – World Premiere in Zurich: Machine keeps human livers alive for one week outside of the body:

“Until now, livers could be stored safely outside the body for only a few hours. With the novel perfusion technology, livers – and even injured livers – can now be kept alive outside of the body for an entire week. This is a major breakthrough in transplantation medicine, which may increase the number of available organs for transplantation and save many lives of patients suffering from severe liver disease or a variety of cancers”

*Gamechanger?

Dec 152019
 

Sound waves used to separate microplastics from laundry wastewater:

“In lab tests, the BAW setup was found to capture 95 percent of PET (polyethylene terephthalate) fibers, and 99 percent of Nylon 6 fibers. Before the system can enter production, though, the fiber-separation process needs to be speeded up, as it would currently take washing machines quite a long time to drain.”

*Interesting advancement.

Nov 042018
 

The screenshot image below is from Dent Reality.

It seems they are working on some interesting Augmented Reality technology. Someone is going to make something that creates consumer and retailer value. If you visit their site hopefully you can see a video of the demo the screenshot was from.

 

AR in Retail

Jun 052015
 

  

Pill reminders is interesting. You’ll almost always have your watch on. Also, what if certain drugs are found to be more effective after a workout? Could the watch and app calculate if you have crossed a threshold? 

We are living in interesting times and new technologies meshing together will make for a better future. 

May 292014
 

What You Can’t Say:

“They found that even when the radiologists missed a cancerous lesion, their eyes had usually paused at the site of it. Part of their brain knew there was something there; it just didn’t percolate all the way up into conscious knowledge.”

(Via.) Paul Graham on Twitter.

 

*What caught my eye in this is that it might be possible to have radiologists wear an eye tracking device that measures eye movements. Pause locations would be rechecked if on first inspection the radiologist decides there isn’t a problem that crosses their arbitrary threshold.